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The Importance Of Teeth Restorations

Dental restorations are dedicated to repair damaged or missing tooth structure. Its purpose is of great importance since it avoids degradation of oral health.

Why should we restore a damaged or missing tooth?

  • To allow for proper masticatory function.
  • To prevent any problems that may occur in the absence of intervention.
  • To fill vacant space which stops the migration of neighbouring teeth.
  • To maintain good dental hygiene, which eliminates the plaque and avoids the risk of infection.
  • Tooth restoration embellishes the smile, which has a big impact on confidence and self-esteem.

The Four More Frequent Restorations

Your dental professional may suggest various treatments to replace missing teeth or to restore a damaged tooth. Dental fillings, crowns, implants and prostheses are the most frequent restorations.

Filings remain the number one choice to treat cavities. The bonded restorations are most often used to fill the teeth at the back of the mouth. The composite resin is used to correct various defects caused by cavities, fractures and more. It is generally applied on the visible face of the tooth for aesthetic reasons.

The dental crown is ideal to restore a broken or deformed tooth. It resembles a small hat to completely covers the damaged tooth to strengthen it and improve its aesthetics. It is almost always suggested after root canal treatments to decrease the risk of fracture.

The implant consists of two distinct parts: the screw (or post) at the end of which is built a connector, and the replacement tooth. A variety of implant-supported prostheses are available, such as a dental crown, bridge and complete or partial dentures. This restoration is the closest to natural teeth one can get. It will give you the same confidence, aesthetic and functionality than any natural smile.

A bridge will replace one or more missing teeth. It is permanently affixed to the adjacent teeth using porcelain-covered retainers or metal bands. Once installed, it resembles a natural tooth in all aspects.

Your dentist will guide you through the vast choice of restorations possible and lead you the option that best suits your oral health condition. Never hesitate to ask questions regarding the “how to” of the procedure and what will happen afterward. It will help you in making the right choice.

Informations

Some additional information

This section contains details about our approach, as well as practical information for making your next appointment positive and memorable.

We’ve included a selection of interesting articles, helpful tips and after-care instructions.  Before your first appointment, please fill out the online form for new patients and health questionnaire.

Have questions? Please give us a call. We’ll be happy to provide you with the information you need and get you smiling about your oral health.

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Make an appointment

Make an appointment

To make an appointment, please call us at (514) 907-7525 or fill out the form below.

We will confirm your appointment (by phone call or email) or offer you a different appointment time within 24 hours.

If this is your first appointment with us, click here to open your medical file.








Medical form

Medical form

You are a new patient?

To get a head start, you can complete a form that details your health status before your first appointment at the clinic:

Download the form (dynamic PDF)

  • Save the form on your computer before filling it out.
  • DO NOT FILL IT OUT DIRECTLY FROM YOUR WEB BROWSER
  • Fill out and print the form.
  • Bring the form to the first appointment OR
  • Send it by email to info@dentavive.com

Should you need to cancel your appointment, please notify us by phone or email at least 48 working hours in advance, otherwise you will have to pay a service fee.

** Please note that Dentavive Dental Clinic will not be held responsible for any loss of information, identity theft or any other situation that may occur as a result of emailing your form.

Thank you!

Customer satisfaction survey

Customer satisfaction survey

We care about the quality of our services. That’s why we have prepared a short patient survey to measure your level of satisfaction and let us know what needs improving. Your answers will remain anonymous.



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Teeth Should Not Be Sensitive !

Teeth Should Not Be Sensitive !

Dental sensitivity is described as a sharp and stabbing tooth pain, generally occurring when consuming cold foods or beverages. This is often caused by receding gums or enamel wear which expose the sensitive layer located under the tooth’s enamel: the dentin.

Many factors can cause contact with the dentin and initiate pain:

  • Tooth decay
  • Gum disease
  • Damaged restoration
  • Sinus or ear infection

This condition can develop suddenly or gradually at any age. Tooth sensitivity does not naturally increase over time and has various causes such as eating habits and oral hygiene. For instance, overbrushing or the consumption of acidic foods and drinks may increase tooth sensitivity.

To hedge against tooth sensitivity, one must have an adequate oral hygiene. It is advisable to use a softbristled toothbrush as well as using toothpaste for sensitive teeth. Make sure not to apply excessive pressure during brushing and take time to gently remove any traces of dental plaque by flossing.

Since eating acidic and sugary foods can result in pain, adopting healthy eating habits, focusing on fruits and vegetables, is recommended. Teeth grinding can also explain dentin hypersensitivity. Finally, routine checkups at your dentist remains the best way to keep a healthy mouth.

If pain persists, seek advice from your dentist. They will be more than happy to determine the cause of your pain and provide appropriate solutions.

The Importance Of Scaling

The Importance Of Scaling

Brushing and flossing your teeth at least twice a day is the best way to get rid of plaque. If it is not completely removed, it hardens and becomes tartar. When this occurs, only a dental professional can remove it.

The role of dental hygienists is to provide therapeutic and preventive care aimed at ensuring optimal oral health. This includes detection, assessment, planning, and prevention to ensure good oral health habits.

After a thorough oral examination, the dental hygienist removes tartar from your teeth with a small, purpose-made metal curette. Once the tartar has been eliminated, the hygienist usually polishes the teeth to clear away any stains visible on the tooth surface using a grainy paste applied to the electric rotary tooth cleaning tool. To also ensure that areas between the teeth have been properly cleaned, the hygienist ends the session with dental floss. The dentist will then perform a complete dental check-up.

Scaling helps prevent certain gum diseases such as gingivitis, but also some problems like chronic halitosis (persistent bad breath). Another reason why professional cleaning should not be overlooked is that despite irreproachable oral hygiene, tartar can accumulate under the gums. If it transforms into advanced gum disease, bacteria can enter the bloodstream and reach other parts of the body.

Since periodontal diseases and untreated gingivitis are the leading cause of tooth loss in patients over 35 years of age, regular cleaning are of utmost importance. Omitting to do so puts your gums at risk for serious problems.

Managing Dental Anxiety

Managing Dental Anxiety

What is anxiety?

Anxiety is an abnormal and overwhelming sense of insecurity. It is characterized by apprehension, tension, sweating and fear in a given situation. Under stressful circumstances, the endocrine system produces cortisol, known as the stress hormone. All of the physiological manifestations occurring when one doubts his capacity to cope with a situation are generated by a high level of these hormones. Most of the time, the patient refers to nervousness. Anxiety differentiates from fear since the latter involves a real danger. We can pretty much say that we all had to cope with anxiety at least once in our lives.

Relaxation, the Key to a Positive Experience

Many patients suffer from dental phobias. For this reason, they avoid their dental treatment and jeopardize their oral health. Our role is to reassure you. We will explain how the treatment is performed and answer all of your questions. We know you might have had bad experiences that have left you with a high level of anxiety. In this situation, we can use conscious sedation to carry out your treatment more easily.

Known as “hilarious gas,” inhalational sedation uses a combination of nitrous oxide and oxygen. It allows you to remain conscious throughout the duration of the intervention, in a state of well-being and relaxation. It’s very safe, the uptake is rapid and the dose is easily adjustable. The nitrous oxide is completely excreted from the body quickly after the treatment, and recovery time varies from 3 to 5 minutes. You can, therefore, resume your activities immediately after your treatment. This method is often used in anxious and uncooperative children as well.

Keep in mind that you are not alone in your position. Many people suffer from dental phobia, but few are aware that there are ways to control it. If you are nervous or worried to the point of avoiding visits to the dentist, talk to him. He will not hesitate to recommend conscious sedation for a positive dental experience.

The Importance Of Teeth Restorations

The Importance Of Teeth Restorations

Dental restorations are dedicated to repair damaged or missing tooth structure. Its purpose is of great importance since it avoids degradation of oral health.

Why should we restore a damaged or missing tooth?

  • To allow for proper masticatory function.
  • To prevent any problems that may occur in the absence of intervention.
  • To fill vacant space which stops the migration of neighbouring teeth.
  • To maintain good dental hygiene, which eliminates the plaque and avoids the risk of infection.
  • Tooth restoration embellishes the smile, which has a big impact on confidence and self-esteem.

The Four More Frequent Restorations

Your dental professional may suggest various treatments to replace missing teeth or to restore a damaged tooth. Dental fillings, crowns, implants and prostheses are the most frequent restorations.

Filings remain the number one choice to treat cavities. The bonded restorations are most often used to fill the teeth at the back of the mouth. The composite resin is used to correct various defects caused by cavities, fractures and more. It is generally applied on the visible face of the tooth for aesthetic reasons.

The dental crown is ideal to restore a broken or deformed tooth. It resembles a small hat to completely covers the damaged tooth to strengthen it and improve its aesthetics. It is almost always suggested after root canal treatments to decrease the risk of fracture.

The implant consists of two distinct parts: the screw (or post) at the end of which is built a connector, and the replacement tooth. A variety of implant-supported prostheses are available, such as a dental crown, bridge and complete or partial dentures. This restoration is the closest to natural teeth one can get. It will give you the same confidence, aesthetic and functionality than any natural smile.

A bridge will replace one or more missing teeth. It is permanently affixed to the adjacent teeth using porcelain-covered retainers or metal bands. Once installed, it resembles a natural tooth in all aspects.

Your dentist will guide you through the vast choice of restorations possible and lead you the option that best suits your oral health condition. Never hesitate to ask questions regarding the “how to” of the procedure and what will happen afterward. It will help you in making the right choice.

COIN DES PETITS

The Truth About Fluoride

The Truth About Fluoride

Fluoride is a mineral composed of fluorine combined with another element. It can be found in the soil, fresh or salt water, and the foods we eat. Fluoride has several virtues for oral and dental health, including the capacity to prevent tooth decay, and even eradicate developing cavities.

To stop tooth decay from happening on a large scale at minimal cost, the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Committee on Drinking Water is seeking to include an adequate fluorine level in public drinking water. Children who drink water daily and who have a balanced diet benefit from the quantity of fluoride necessary to fight tooth decay. In case of a deficit, your dentist can advise you on the different options available, such as use of fluoridated toothpaste, mouthwash or gel.

However, moderation is always the best policy! A fluoride overdose risks causing dental fluorosis in your child. An appreciable symptom of this disease is the formation of small whitish spots on the teeth. That is why it is always wise to obtain a dental professional’s opinion before changing our habits.

Your Child’s First Visit to the Dentist

Your Child’s First Visit to the Dentist

It is strongly suggested the first visit to the dentist takes place within 6 months following the eruption of the first tooth. This means your child should visit us around one year of age. This being said, it is better to come and meet us when your child is able to cooperate.

During the first appointment, the dentist and dental hygienist will put your child at ease, examine and clean his teeth and review brushing and flossing techniques with you.

It is estimated that 50% of the population is afraid of dentists. It is important for parents not to transmit this fear to their children. Do not minimize your kid’s fears and bear with him. Information and a positive attitude will reassure your child and determine his attitude in the future.

Your collaboration is important before, during and after the visit. The first visit aims to familiarize the child with the environment and create bonds and trust between the dentist and him.

Before the first visit

  • Read your child one of the many books featuring a character who visits the dentist for the first time.
  • Explain what the dentist will do.
  • Go over the steps of the visit the day before the appointment.
  • Never tell a child that going to the dentist will be painless.

During the visit

  • You may be asked to sit in the dentist’s chair and hold your child during the examination.
  • If your child is older, you may be asked to return to the waiting room once the initial contact is made.
  • Listen to the instructions and suggestions you are given on how to care for your child’s teeth.
  • Keep a positive attitude about the consultation at all times.
  • Ask for another appointment in six months.

After the visit

  • Make sure that your child brushes her teeth at least twice a day or after every meal.
  • Floss your child’s teeth once a day.
  • Monitor what your child eats and offer foods that have a low sugar content.
  • Till the age of 10, make sure your child brushes his teeth before bed time.

CONSEILS POST-OPÉRATOIRES

After minor oral surgery

After minor oral surgery

To speed up the healing process, we strongly suggest following the recommendations outlined below. However, it is perfectly normal to experience some discomfort and swelling after surgery.

On the day of the surgery

  • Apply firm pressure on the compresses and keep them in your mouth for about an hour or two. Change the compresses every 20 to 30 minutes, as needed.
  • Put some ice on your cheek at regular intervals (20 minutes of ice per hour).
  • In case of bleeding, bite down on some gauze or a slightly dampened tea bag for about 20 minutes.

Things to avoid

  • Do not rinse your mouth or spit
  • Do not drink through a straw
  • Do not smoke
  • Do not eat or drink hot food and beverages; choose cool, soft foods instead
  • Do not engage in vigorous activities

Pain

  • During the first 24 to 72 hours following your surgery, take acetaminophen (Tylenol, Atasol), ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil) or the painkillers prescribed to you, but avoid aspirin.
  • Rinse your mouth three times a day with a mixture of warm water and salt (1/2 tsp. of salt in 1 cup of water) the day after the surgery and until healing is complete.
  • Bruises may appear on your skin. They will gradually disappear in five to seven days.
  • You may have difficulty opening your mouth. This discomfort will go away in four to five days.
  • If pain gets worse after three days, do not hesitate to call us.

You should be feeling better and able to resume normal activities within a few days. If you experience pain, excessive bleeding, swelling that lasts two to three days, or a reaction to the prescribed medication, please call us right away at 514 907-7525

After a tooth extraction

After a tooth extraction

To speed up the healing process, we strongly suggest following the recommendations outlined below. However, please remember that it is normal to feel some discomfort and to experience swelling in the lower part of your face after a tooth extraction.

On the day of the surgery

  • Keep the compresses in your mouth for an hour or two and apply firm pressure. Change the compresses every 30 minutes, as needed
  • Keep your head upright at all times
  • Apply a cold compress to your cheek at regular intervals (20 minutes an hour)
  • In case of bleeding, bite down on some gauze or a slightly dampened tea bag for about 20 minutes
  • Many patients experience bleeding and notice a reddish tint in their saliva
  • Limit physical activities

Things to avoid

  • Do not remove the scab as it helps to promote healing
  • Do not eat until the bleeding stops
  • Do not drink through a straw
  • Do not rinse your mouth or spit
  • Do not smoke or drink alcohol
  • Do not eat foods that are difficult to chew
  • Do not brush your teeth near the extraction area within 72 hours of the procedure

Pain

Take the medication prescribed to you, as needed. Also, take the antibiotics for the entire duration prescribed, even if you no longer feel any symptoms.

Suggested foods

The day of the extraction, only consume soft foods and warm beverages. Once you feel better, you can eat and drink as you normally would.

Starting the day after the surgery up until you’re fully healed

  • Rinse your mouth three times a day with a mixture of warm water and salt (1/2 tsp. of salt in 1 cup of water)
  • Brush and floss your teeth every day to remove plaque and to ensure better long-term results. Avoid brushing your teeth near the extraction area within 72 hours of the procedure
  • Avoid eating hard food (nuts, candy, ice)
  • It may be difficult for you to pronounce some words and you may have more saliva than usual. You should be back to normal in less than a week.
  • Bruises may appear on your skin. They will gradually disappear in five to seven days
  • You may also have difficulty opening your mouth. This discomfort will go away in about five days
  • If pain gets worse after three days, do not hesitate to call us

You should be feeling better and able to resume normal activities within a few days. If you experience pain, excessive bleeding, swelling that lasts two to three days, or a reaction to the prescribed medication, please call us right away at 514 907-7525

After having a crown or bridge installed

After having a crown or bridge installed

To speed up the healing process, we strongly suggest following the instructions outlined below. However, it is perfectly normal to experience some discomfort and swelling after surgery.

Two appointments are needed to install crowns or bridges. During your first visit, we make an impression of the teeth to be replaced. Then, we install temporary crowns or bridges to protect your teeth until the replacement teeth are ready.

On the day of the procedure

  • Take the medication prescribed to you, as needed

Things to avoid

  • Do not drink hot liquids when you’re under anesthesia
  • Do not eat sticky or hard foods (chewing gum, candy)

Suggested foods

  • Chew on the other side of your mouth

Starting the day after the surgery up until you’re fully healed

  • Brush your teeth as you normally would, but be careful when flossing so that the temporary crown doesn’t fall off
  • If the temporary crown comes off, come and see us so that we can cement it back into place. The purpose of the temporary crown is to prevent other teeth from moving and ensure that your permanent crown can be installed properly.

If you experience pain or have questions, call us at 514 907-7525

After a cosmetic reconstruction

After a cosmetic reconstruction

These instructions must be followed to ensure proper healing after a dental treatment. Please note that discomfort and swelling are normal after mouth surgery.

On the day of the surgery

  • Put some ice on your cheek at regular intervals (20 minutes per hour).
  • If you are bleeding, bite on a gauze compress or lightly moistened teabag for 20 minutes.
  • Bleeding and saliva tinted with blood are normal post-operative occurrences.

Things to avoid

  • Do not eat until bleeding stops
  • Do not drink through a straw
  • Do not rinse your mouth or spit
  • Do not drink alcohol or smoke
  • Do not eat hard foods
  • Do not engage in intense exercise; you should rest

Pain

  • If you experience pain, take the medication prescribed to you

Diet

  • Only consume soft foods and warm beverages

Starting the day after the surgery up until you’re fully healed

  • Rinse your mouth three times a day with warm water and salt (½ tsp. of salt in 1 cup of water) the day after your surgery
  • Brush and floss your teeth every day to remove plaque and ensure the best long-term results. Avoid brushing your teeth in the sensitive area within 72 hours of the procedure
  • Avoid eating hard food (nuts, candy, ice)
  • Remember that smoking and drinking coffee, tea or red wine can stain your teeth
  • If you do sports, order a custom-made mouthguard
  • You may have trouble pronouncing words or experience an increase in saliva production. Everything should return to normal within a week
  • Bruises may appear on your skin. They will gradually disappear in five to seven days
  • You may have difficulty opening your mouth. This should pass within four or five days
  • If pain gets worse after three days, do not hesitate to call us

Please note that it takes time for your brain to recognize the new position and thickness of your teeth. As a result, it could take a few days or even weeks before you feel comfortable closing your mouth. If the problem persists after several weeks, call us at 514 907-7525